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Spay and baby teeth?


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Posted

Hello! I've got a really interesting question about having my dog spay. The vet wants to spay her when she's 6 mos. old. plus, here's the kicker, she wants to pull all her baby teeth at the same time. I have had female dogs before, one Shih Tzu, and a Lhasa Apso and never have heard of such a thing. Both were spay with their teeth in tact. I called the breeder and she laughed. She said it sounds like she's trying to pick my pocket. I will not have her spay before she's 9 mos. old. The breeder insists that it's better to wait until they have reached full weight. Poppy is 5 mos. old and weighs 5.75 lbs. My guess is she'll end up at 7 lbs. So much for buying the runt! Is there any legitimacy to this teeth pulling? I'm not going to allow that I'm just interested if anyone else has had this sort of thing happen to them. :wacko:

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Posted

I have never heard of that! I would NOT let my Vet do that, unless it needs to be done for health reasons. I think you need to find a new Vet and not one trying to take advantage of you for your money!

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Posted

Shih Tzu are notorious for retaining baby teeth, which CAN have ill health effects later in life. It is very common to pull any retained baby teeth when a bitch is spayed.

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Posted

I had Bristol spayed at nine months and had her retained baby teeth pulled then.

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Posted

Does this go for the males also?

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Posted

I suppose that includes males. I just don't see the point to having teeth pulled if there isn't some kind of health issue going on with the teeth. The only thing I can figure is the vet industry is hurting like every other business and they just wait for some schmuck to come along. The thing is I've been gone to the same vet for 13 years. I trusted them but now I think I need to find another vet.

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Posted

All of my Shih Tzu have been spayed/neutered at around the age of 5 months with the exception of Opie (his breeder had it done before he was 8 weeks). My vet always removed the retained baby teeth. He charged $2 per tiny tooth. Not a big deal and way less of an issue than if you had to deal with it later down the road. There was absolutely no bleeding what so ever. It was explained to me that if the baby teeth remained they could cause the permanent teeth to grow in crooked. On the flip side of that is that Opie did undergo pediatric neuter surgery and was far too young to have teeth removed. His all fell out naturally and he does not have a crooked smile :)

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Posted

All of my Shih Tzu have been spayed/neutered at around the age of 5 months with the exception of Opie (his breeder had it done before he was 8 weeks). My vet always removed the retained baby teeth. He charged $2 per tiny tooth. Not a big deal and way less of an issue than if you had to deal with it later down the road. There was absolutely no bleeding what so ever. It was explained to me that if the baby teeth remained they could cause the permanent teeth to grow in crooked. On the flip side of that is that Opie did undergo pediatric neuter surgery and was far too young to have teeth removed. His all fell out naturally and he does not have a crooked smile :)

Thanks for the info, I guess I'll have Bosco's vet look at his on his visit in April or when I make his appointment to be neutered next month. He's 1 now and I don't know if he has any baby teeth.

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Posted

Retained baby teeth also contribute to excessive plaque formation in adulthood. Best to get 'em out when the dog is spayed or neutered.

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